Judy Cannon, PhD

Judy Cannon, PhD

Faculty Titles
Assistant Professor
Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology

Research Program
Cellular and Molecular Oncology

Personal Statement

The goal of my laboratory is to study the signals that drive migration and tissue specific residency of both normal and leukemic T cells using cutting edge two photon microscopy combined with computational analysis and modeling. My training in immunology focused on the understanding of how signaling networks function together to control T cell activation and migration. My predoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Janis Burkhardt used fluorescence microscopy and mutational analysis to identify the domains within the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein that regulated its localization to the immunological synapse. I then joined the laboratory of Dr. Anne Sperling to study the role of the molecule CD43 in regulating T cell function. In Dr. Sperling’s lab, I helped to identify a novel function for CD43 in regulating T cell migration. Since establishing my own laboratory at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, I have focused my work on developing novel methods of imaging T cell motion in intact tissues and also computationally modeling normal and leukemic T cell migration. We recently published studies showing specialized motion of T cells in the lung using a combination of two photon imaging of intact lung and computational analysis (a). In addition, I showed a novel role for CARMA1 in regulating leukemia cell accumulation in the CNS of animals with T- ALL (b). I routinely use flow cytometry, two photon imaging, and bioluminescent imaging, quantitatively analysis, and computational modeling to understand migration patterns of both leukemic T cells and how key signaling pathways can change our understanding of leukemia cell migration through tissues such as the CNS. At the University of New Mexico, I am member of the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center Cancer Center which is a Comprehensive NCI designated Cancer Center as well as co-investigator of the NIGMS funded Spatiotemporal Modeling Systems Biology Center. I am also a Core director for the Autophagy, Inflammation, and Metabolism Center of Biomedical Research Excellence Inflammation and Metabolism Core.