Cancer Genetics, Epigenetics & Genomics

Mary Ann Osley, PhD

Mary Ann Osley, PhD

Steven Belinsky, PhD

Steven Belinsky, PhD

Program Leaders: Mary Ann Osley, PhD, and Steven Belinsky, PhD


Cancer Genetics, Epigenetics and Genomics (CGEG) Program members study the regulation of the genome in normal and cancer cells and discover and translate new genetic and epigenetic markers to clinical and community settings through the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in the New Mexico catchment area and the nation.

Model organisms, cell culture systems, primary human samples, and in vivo model systems as well as biochemical, genetic, molecular, and genomic approaches, are used to perform basic and translational research related to three specific aims:

  1. To characterize the regulation of gene expression and cell survival in normal and cancer cells through
    the application of genetic, epigenetic, and genomic approaches.
  2. To define the pathways regulating genome stability in normal and cancer cells, and to determine how the
    environment and environmental carcinogens interact with these pathways to promote genome instability
    and cancer risk.
  3. To discover and translate novel genetic, epigenetic, and genomic targets and signatures in cancer cells
    to community and clinical diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

The Program is co-led by Steven Belinsky, PhD, an expert in the application of translational epigenomics to lung cancer etiology, and Mary Ann Osley, PhD, an expert in the definition of basic epigenetic mechanisms in genome regulation.

The program is comprised of 29members (20full and 9 associate) whose work is supported by $4,882,802 in annual direct cost funding, of which $1,525,483 is from the NCI and $4,459,265 is peer-reviewed as of April 1, 2018. The discoveries made in this program have resulted in 51 publications over the past year, of which 33% are intra-programmatic collaborations and 29% are inter-programmatic collaborations, with a total collaborative publication level of 57%.


Cancer Genetics, Epigenetics & Genomics Researchers